Friday, October 29, 2010

All treats and no tricks!

Happy Halloween!! I really love Halloween....I have ever since I was a kid and now I get to experience it from my daughters perspective (she is 4) and it brings back all the fun and thrills I had as a child!

I just wanted to remind everyone (especially all the new people stopping by!) that my giveaway for this month is still going on! Entries will close on October 31st. I won't be tricking anyone....but one lucky winner is in for a super, duper treat! And the treats will keep going long after the giveaway of the signed Cake Pops book from Bakerella...because you will have all the tools to make your own Cake Pops! Yay!

Good luck to everyone who is entering!!

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Beauty really IS a beast!

The past couple of days I have had a new address. Oh...you didn't know I moved? Well, I really didn't. It's just been a temporary address - at the mall. You see, I have been browsing the stores for a fancy, schmancy evening gown for the Blissful Wishes Ball, which will be taking place November 4, 2010 here in Los Angeles. The Blissful Wishes Ball is a charity fundraising event for an organization that has become near and dear to my heart, Wish Upon a Wedding. This organization grants wedding wishes to couples who are either terminally ill or facing a life altering situation. So...why is beauty a beast? One word - Spanx.
Have you heard of them? You must have. I have heard of them but I haven't ever owned a pair of these, let alone ever tried them on. So while dress shopping (sort of in a frenzy) the sales lady brought me a pair to put on under the dress. My friend, who already had her Spanx on, sat laughing outside the dressing room, while listening to me grunt, huff and puff to put these on. I asked, kind of out of breath, "How high are these suppose to go?" That comment I think had her on the floor laughing. I was bound up, sitting, unable to move to actually see if she was on the floor laughing, but I think she was. So, I got them on, sort of, and then slipped into the dress. Oh. My. God. It was amazing - not only the dress but the way I looked in it. Oh, did I mention it was even a full size smaller than I normally wear? It was - and it fit. The dress was gorgeous but, I was literally enthralled with how it looked and the shape I now had. I bought the dress and the Spanx. I didn't even look at the price because, really, you can not put a price tag on that feeling. Later, I did look at my receipt and had a little sticker shock - $76.00. My fleeting thought was "Ouch" but, that thought quickly flew out the window when the vision of what I looked like in the dress came into my minds eye.

Dress to get results! Featuring maximum zoned compression, this luxe wardrobe solution comfortably shapes problem areas and accentuates your waistline. Ideal for every occasion when you want to wow! <br><br><ul><li>Shapes midriff, hips, thighs and rear for a seamless look</li><li>Lifts your rear</li><li>Removable straps attach to any bra </li><li>Legband-free design eliminates bulging at the thighs</li><li>Cotton double gusset for comfort and ease when nature calls </li></ul>
This is not me (I wish - ha!) 

So, I get home and I am still on a high, I grab my husband and show him the dress. He lavished compliments (he's a good guy!) and then I pull out the Spanx. I said "Check out the size of this!" It really looks like it could fit my 4 year old. I told him the dressing room story and then told him that getting into it I REALLY felt like I was a sausage being squeezed into a tube! But, it doesn't matter...I told him how amazing it made me look in the dress to which he replied "You would look amazing in any dress with or without that" (yup...he is a really good guy!). So, the moral of this long tail? Beauty is a beast....and so is getting into a Spanx body shaper...but damn...is it worth it!!!



Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Have you seen...??

Last night, I happened to be walking by the TV and a commercial just started. After a quick walk by, it caught my eye. I saw a high heel shoe on the floor, a mans cummerbund and miscellaneous items panning to a bride and groom. I stopped and looked back but the commercial was over - thank goodness for DVR's! I asked my husband, "What was that about?" and he replied he wasn't paying attention. He grabbed the remote and we watched again! This time, I notice sitting on the bed, still in their wedding clothes, are the bride and groom reading cards and laughing about a check made out to Mr. and Mrs. So-and-So and the groom says something about HIS parents getting a check but then they grab their iPhone and deposit the check into their account! This is a new feature that Chase is offering called Quick Deposit. I was floored! How cool is THAT?! I love it. I grabbed my iPhone, downloaded the app and signed into my account. I had to try this...what a great little tool. I have had a couple of checks in my purse waiting to go to the bank...which I haven't gotten around to doing. Took the pictures, entered the amount and tada! Done. Awesome! 



(not my account or check! This picture taken from here)

There are a few little catches - you can only deposit up to $1000 a day and you have a $3000 limit per month. Also, you need to photograph the front and back of the checks on a non-reflective surface. You must have a steady hand! It was pretty simple, actually. I will get better at it the more I do it! I just thought that was the most fun thing...and I am so excited to share this!! I HATE going to the bank and now...I don't have to!! Click here to read more about this on the Chase website

(this is not me or my phone! Picture taken from here)


Monday, October 25, 2010

Orthoptera of Berrien County, Michigan, and Vicinity

The insect order Orthoptera includes the crickets, grasshoppers, and katydids and allies. The species in this order are commonly referred to as "singing insects" because of their loud, distinctive, and often repetitive vocalizations.

The primary source for this list was Theodore H. Hubbell’s (1922) The Dermaptera and Orthoptera of Berrien County, Michigan, supplemented by Roger G. Bland’s (2003) The Orthoptera of Michigan and Thomas J. Walker and Thomas E. Moore’s (2004) Singing insects of North America. The Orthoptera Species File Online was used to sort out synonyms.

According to Bland (2003), more than 25,000 species of Orthoptera are known worldwide, an estimated 1,210 species have been documented in North America north of Mexico, and 137 species are known in Michigan.

The 98 species known or likely to occur in Berrien County (85 documented from Berrien County, plus an additional 13 from neighboring Cass and/or Van Buren counties) represent 44 genera, 18 subfamilies, 8 families, and 2 suborders. Another 10 species (shown in square brackets below) may possibly occur in Berrien County or vicinity based on presumed ranges depicted by Walker and Moore (2003).

In the following list, scientific and common names follow Bland (2003), with alternative common names (if any) in curly brackets. One or more of the following symbols appear after the species name, where * = specimen(s) reported from Berrien County by Hubbell (1922); # = specimen(s) documented from Berrien, Cass, or Van Buren counties by Bland (2003); + = the known or presumed range of the species, as depicted by Walker and Moore (2003), includes Berrien County; and ^ = a species reported from Michigan by O’Brien (2004).

Counties with documented specimen records are shown in square brackets, where B = Berrien, C = Cass, and V = Van Buren.

For each species collected in Berrien County by Hubbell (1922), the number of specimens/collecting localities is shown in parentheses.

The one non-native Introduced species is indicated as such.
SUBORDER CAELIFERA (grasshoppers)

Family Acrididae (short-horned grasshoppers):
Subfamily Acridinae (slant-faced grasshoppers):
  • Metaleptea (=Tryxalis) brevicornis, SHORT-HORNED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (53/3)
  • Stethophyma lineatum (=Arcyptera lineata), STRIPED SEDGE GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (21/2)
    Subfamily Cyrtacanthacridinae (bird grasshoppers):
  • Schistocerca alutacea, LEATHER-COLORED BIRD GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C] (43/4)
  • Schistocerca americana (=serialis), AMERICAN BIRD GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (2/2)
  • Schistocerca emarginata, PRAIRIE BIRD GRASSHOPPER#^ [B,C,V]
    Subfamily Gomphocerinae (slant-faced grasshoppers):
  • Ageneotettix deorum, SAND GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (1/1)
  • Chloealtis conspersa, SPRINKLED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (86/4)
  • Chorthippus curtipennis, MARSH MEADOW GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (63/6)
  • Dichromorpha viridis, SHORT-WINGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (16/1)
  • Orphulella pelidna, SPOTTED-WINGED GRASSHOPPER#^ [B,V] {SC}
  • Orphulella speciosa, PASTURE GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (27/3)
  • Pseudopomala brachyptera, BUNCHGRASS GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C] (10/1)
  • Syrbula admirabilis, HANDSOME GRASSHOPPER#^ [B,C]
    Subfamily Melanoplinae (spur-throated grasshoppers):
  • Melanoplus angustipennis, NARROW-WINGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (72/4)
  • Melanoplus bivittatus, TWO-STRIPED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (105/4)
  • Melanoplus borealis, NORTHERN GRASSHOPPER#^ [C]
  • Melanoplus confusus, LITTLE GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (82/1)
  • Melanoplus differentialis, DIFFERENTIAL GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (25/6)
  • Melanoplus fasciatus, HUCKLEBERRY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (10/1)
  • Melanoplus femurrubrum, RED-LEGGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (63/5)
  • Melanoplus flavidus, BLUE-LEGGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (3/1) {SC}
  • Melanoplus gracilis, GRACEFUL GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (32/4)
  • Melanoplus keeleri, BROAD-NECKED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (56/3)
  • Melanoplus punctulatus, GRISEOUS GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C] (4/2)
  • Melanoplus sanguinipes (=mexicanus), MIGRATORY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (296/5)
  • Melanoplus scudderi, SCUDDER'S SHORT-WINGED GRASSHOPPER#^ [C]
  • Melanoplus viridipes, GREEN-LEGGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [V] (58/3)
  • Melanoplus walshii, WALSH'S GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (4/2)
  • Paroxya hoosieri (=clavuliger), HOOSIER GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (102/3) {SC}
    Subfamily Oedipodinae (band-winged grasshoppers):
  • Arphia pseudonietana, RED-WINGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (12/2)
  • Arphia sulphurea, SPRING YELLOW-WINGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (48/3)
  • Arphia xanthoptera, AUTUMN YELLOW-WINGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (34/2)
  • Camnula pellucida, CLEAR-WINGED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (58/2)
  • Chortophaga viridifasciata, GREEN-STRIPED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (19/3)
  • Dissosteira carolina, CAROLINA GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (38/4)
  • Encoptolophus sordidus, DUSKY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (19/3)
  • Pardalophora haldemanii, HALDEMAN'S GRASSHOPPER#^ [B,V]
  • Psinidia fenestralis, LONG-HORNED GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (30/2) {SC}
  • Spharagemon bolli, BOLL'S GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (42/3)
  • Spharagemon collare, MOTTLED SAND GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (82/7)
  • Spharagemon marmorata, NORTHERN MARBLED GRASSHOPPER#^ [B]
  • Trimerotropis maritima, SEASIDE GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (56/3)

    Family Tetrigidae (pygmy grasshoppers):
    Subfamily Batrachideinae:
  • Tettigidea armata, SPINED PYGMY LOCUST*#^ [B] (25/3)
  • Tettigidea lateralis, SEDGE PYGMY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (24/3)
    Subfamily Tetriginae:
  • Nomotettix cristatus, NORTHERN CRESTED PYGMY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (2/1)
  • Paratettix cucullatus, HOODED PYGMY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (85/4)
  • Tetrix arenosa (=Acrydium arenosum), OBSCURE PYGMY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (48/2)
  • Tetrix ornate (=Acrydium ornatum and hancocki), ORNATE PYGMY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,C,V] (14/1)
  • Tetrix subulata (=Acrydium granulatum), SLENDER PYGMY GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B,V] (9/2)

    Family Tridactylidae (pygmy mole grasshoppers):
    Subfamily Tridactylinae (pygmy mole grasshoppers):
  • Ellipes minutus (=minuta), MINUTE PYGMY MOLE GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (35/1)
  • Neotrydactylus (=Tridactylus) apicalis, LARGER PYGMY MOLE GRASSHOPPER*#^ [B] (9/2)

    SUBORDER ENSIFERA (crickets, katydids, and bush katydids)

    Family Gryllidae (true crickets):
    Subfamily Gryllinae (field crickets and house crickets):
    [Acheta domesticus, House Cricket+^ (Introduced)]
  • Gryllus pennsylvanicus (=assimilis), FALL FIELD CRICKET*#+^ [B,C] (102/5)
  • Gryllus veletus, SPRING FIELD CRICKET#+^ [B,C,V]
    Subfamily Nemobiinae (ground crickets):
  • Allonemobius allardi, ALLARD'S GROUND CRICKET#+^ [B,C,V]
  • Allonemobius (=Nemobius) fasciatus, STRIPED GROUND CRICKET*#+^ [B,C,V] (76/4)
  • Allonemobius griseus, GRAY GROUND CRICKET#+^ [C]
  • Allonemobius maculatus, SPOTTED GROUND CRICKET#+^ [C]
    [Allonemobius tinnulus, Tinkling Ground Cricket+^]
  • Eunemobius (=Nemobius) carolinus, CAROLINE GROUND CRICKET*#+^ [B] (10/3)
    [Eunemobius confusus, Confused Ground Cricket+]
  • Eunemobius melodius, MELODIOUS GROUND CRICKET#+^ [B]
  • Neonemobius (=Nemobius) palustris, MARSH GROUND CRICKET*#+^ [B,C] (4/1)
    [Neonemobius variegatus, Variegated Ground Cricket+]
    Subfamily Trigonidiinae (sword-bearing crickets):
  • Anaxipha exiqua, SAY'S BUSH CRICKET#+^ [B,C]

    Family Gryllotalpidae (mole crickets):
    Subfamily Gryllotalpinae (mole crickets):
  • Neocurtilla (=Gryllotalpa) hexadactyla, NORTHERN MOLE CRICKET*#+^ [B,C] (12/2)

    Family Oecanthidae:
    Subfamily Oecanthinae (tree crickets):
  • Neoxabea bipunctata, TWO-SPOTTED TREE CRICKET#+^ [C]
    [Oecanthus exclamationis, Davis's Tree Cricket+^]
    [Oecanthus forbesi, Forbes’s Tree Cricket+]
  • Oecanthus fultoni, SNOWY TREE CRICKET#+^ [B]
    [Oecanthus latipennis, Broad-winged Tree Cricket+]
  • Oecanthus nigricornis, BLACK-HORNED TREE CRICKET*#+^ [B,C] (30/4)
  • Oecanthus niveus, NARROW-WINGED TREE CRICKET*#+^ [C] (1/1)
  • Oecanthus pini, PINE TREE CRICKET#+^ [B] {SC}
  • Oecanthus quadripunctatus, FOUR-SPOTTED TREE CRICKET*#+^ [B,C] (27/4)

    Family Rhaphidophoridae (cave and camel crickets):
  • Ceuthophilus divergens, DIVERGENT CAMEL CRICKET#^ [B]
  • Ceuthophilus guttulosus (=nigricans), THOMAS'S CAMEL CRICKET*#^ [B] (5/2)
  • Ceuthophilus latens, BLACK-SIDED CAMEL CRICKET*#^ [B] (58/2)

    Family Tettigoniidae (katydids):
    Subfamily Conocephalinae (meadow katydids):
  • Conocephalus attenuatus, LONG-TAILED MEADOW KATYDID#+^ [C]
  • Conocephalus brevipennis, SHORT-WINGED MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B,C,V] (46/4)
  • Conocephalus fasciatus, SLENDER MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B,C,V] (32/5)
  • Conocephalus nemoralis, WOODLAND MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B,V] (11/1)
  • Conocephalus nigropleurum (=nigropleurus), BLACK-SIDED MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B,C] (22/3)
    [Conocephalus saltans, Prairie Meadow Katydid+^]
  • Conocephalus strictus, STRAIGHT-LANCED MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B] (31/3)
  • Orchelimum campestris, DUSKY-FACED MEADOW KATYDID#+^ [B,C,V]
    [Orchelimum concinnum, Stripe-faced Meadow Katydid*+^ (6/2) {SC}]
  • Orchelimum delicatum, DELICATE MEADOW KATYDID#+^ [C] {SC}
  • Orchelimum gladiator, GLADIATOR MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B] (20/6)
  • Orchelimum nigripes, BLACK-LEGGED MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B,C,V] (15/2)
  • Orchelimum volantum, NIMBLE MEADOW KATYDID#+^ [B]
  • Orchelimum vulgare, COMMON MEADOW KATYDID*#+^ [B,V] (60/5)
    Subfamily Copiphorinae (conehead katydids):
  • Neoconocephalus ensiger, SWORD-BEARING CONEHEAD KATYDID*#+^ [B,C,V] (14/2)
    [Neoconocephalus lyristes, Slender Conehead Katydid+^ {SC}]
  • Neoconocephalus nebrascensis, NEBRASKA CONEHEAD KATYDID*#+^ [B] (4/1)
  • Neoconocephalus retusus, ROUND-TIPPED CONEHEAD KATYDID#^ [C] {SC}
  • Neoconocephalus robustus, ROBUST CONEHEAD KATYDID*#+^ [B,C] (3/2)
    Subfamily Phaneropterinae (bush katydids and others):
  • Amblycorypha oblongifolia, OBLONG-WINGED KATYDID*#+^ [B,C,V] (26/2)
  • Amblycorypha rotundifolia, ROUND-WINGED KATYDID#+^ [C]
  • Microcentrum rhombifolium, ANGLE-WINGED KATYDID#+^ [C]
  • Scudderia curvicauda, CURVE-TAILED BUSH KATYDID*#+^ [B,C] (9/2)
  • Scudderia fasciata, HEMLOCK BUSH KATYDID#+^ [B] {SC}
  • Scudderia furcata, FORK-TAILED BUSH KATYDID*#+^ [B,C,V] (31/4)
  • Scudderia pistillata, BROAD-TAILED BUSH KATYDID*#+^ [B,C,V] (13/5)
  • Scudderia septentrionalis, NORTHERN BUSH KATYDID#+^ [B,C]
  • Scudderia texensis, TEXAS BUSH KATYDID*#+^ [B,C] (15/3)
    Subfamily Pseudophyllinae (true katydids):
  • Pterophylla camellifolia, NORTHERN TRUE KATYDID*#+^ [B,C]
    Subfamily Tettigoniinae (shield-backed katydids):
  • Atlanticus testaceus, SHORT-LEGGED SHIELD-BACKED KATYDID*#+^ [B,C] (6/2)
  • Sources:

    Alexander, Richard D., Ann E. Pace, and Daniel Otte. 1972. The singing insects of Michigan. Great Lakes Entomologist 5: 33-69.

    Bland, Roger G. 2003. The Orthoptera of Michigan—biology, keys, and descriptions of grasshoppers, katydids, and crickets. Michigan State University Extension Bulletin E-2815, 220 pp.

    Hubbell, Theodore H. 1922. The Dermaptera and Orthoptera of Berrien County, Michigan.

    O'Brien, Mark. 2004. Checklist of Michigan orthopteroids.

    Otte, Daniel, David C. Eades, Maria Marta Cigliano, and Holger Braun. 2010. Orthoptera Species File Online (Version 2.0/4.0).

    Walker, Thomas J., and Thomas E. Moore. 2004. Singing insects of North America.

    Thursday, October 21, 2010

    A cake pop here...

    A cake pop here....a cake pop there....here a cake pop, there a cake pop...everywhere a cake pop! It's true! They are the rage....they are amazing and cute (just like Bakerella!)! The book signing tour goes on - but check her site to see where she has been - and all the people that love cake pops! The smiles are contagious! The giveaway for the Cake Pop book signed by Bakerella and the pretty sanding sugars from Williams-Sonoma is still ongoing! You have time to enter....so what are you waiting for???? Click here now!

    Before you know it....you will be making...

    Sheep Cake Pops

    Smiley Face Pops

    Turkey Pops



    5 Year Wedding Anniversary

    While most of you are out there planning a wedding, tomorrow marks the 5th year that I have been married! Talking with friends, I was reminded about the traditional gifts you could exchange on milestone anniversaries. Traditional gifts for the 5th year revolve around...wood. Wood? Seriously. Of course, there isn't any written rule out there that you have to follow these traditional gifts - I am pretty sure my husband doesn't even know there are traditional gifts for anniversaries!! In my search for who even made up these traditions (because seriously...I think a spa gift certificate would be great) I found a site that said the 5th year is cause for celebration because after 5 years wood represents "a five year marriage is strong and durable like wood". Ok, that makes a little more sense! So here are some of my (insert clean, pure, get-my-mind-out-of-the-gutter wood gifts to give my husband) ideas:


    Cherish the Little things Primitive Framed Stitchery

    Personalized Heart and Arrow Wedding Guest Book Journal Notebook Rustic Cinderella Renaissance Fairytale

    Personalized With Your Initial or Monogram Wedding Wood Wine Box Rustic Engraved Renaissance Fairytale Woodland Lake Beach Cottage CHIC Housewarming Bridal Shower 5 and 6 Anniversary Present

    Photo Letter Blocks- LAST NAME WEDDING / ENGAGEMENT GIFT- per block price

    The next anniversary that offers a "traditional" gift is at the 10 year mark...and that revolves around tin...and/or aluminum. Exciting huh?

    Sunday, October 17, 2010

    Imagination+animation+technology= a profoundly jaw-dropping filmic experience

    I was emailed about this yesterday(thanks, Joe and David Doherty), and it's something I thought the passersby here would definitely appreciate. The link comes from a site called Kotaku, and as they wrote, in "a technique called video mapping, the Macula project takes the 600-year-old Astronomical Clock on Old Town Square in Prague and transforms it into one of the most impressive things we've ever seen. See for yourself."

    The 600 Years from the macula on Vimeo.



    Quoting from the Makula website (translated from Czech):

    Video mapping using current technology available in the entertainment industry, a whole new way. The main contents are the projections to cooperate with the selected object and try to break the perception perspective of the viewer. With the projector can fold and stress any shape, line or space. Evocative play of light on the physical object creates a new dimension and changing the view of the seemingly "normal thing". Everything becomes an illusion.

    I think this is pretty cool stuff.

    Put a fork in me!

    I came across these adorable personalized silverware/server ware items and had to share! Etsy seller monkeysalwayslook (and really...when I read the store name I was thinking...am I now a monkey?!) creates these vintage pieces with any personalized saying. I am ooh-oohing (monkey sound)... For $22? I thought that was a bargain for something you will have forever!

    Personalized Wedding Cake Serving Fork or Cake Topper
    Personalized Wedding Cake Serving Fork or Cake Topper
    Personalized Wedding Cake Serving Fork or Cake Topper
    Personalized Wedding Cake Serving Fork or Cake Topper

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010

    It's Giveaway Time!

    Did you notice in my last post I said Angie (the cake pop lady and mastermind of Bakerella) signed my books? That's right! I bought one book for myself and one for a lucky blog reader!! While I was waiting for my number to be called (I was 85 of like 300) I browsed all the shelves at Williams-Sonoma. I picked up quite a few goodies to get started on testing out my cake pop skills...but I was thinking of my dear readers as well! 


    So, here is what you could win this month:

    Cake Pops - The Book!
    Signed by Bakerella (here she is signing my copy!)

    And...here is the 2nd copy signed for you!

    The lucky blog winner will also get 4 Sanding Sugars from Williams-Sonoma
    Colors are: Red, Black, Pink and White

    • You must choose to follow my blog PUBLICLY
    • For a SECOND entry blog about this contest and leave an ADDITIONAL comment to let me know you did that with a link to the post (I will check!)
    • For a THIRD entry twitter about this contest and leave an ADDITIONAL comment to let me know you did that with a link to the post! You can find my twitter page here
    5 BONUS ENTRIES: Grab my Blog Button and add it to your page (leave an additional post with link to let me know you did this!) and get FIVE bonus entries!


    As always, you can get 8 entries into this giveaway! Yay!

    This giveaway will end on: October 31st at 5pm PST and the winner will be posted shortly there after!

    What you win: 1 signed copy of Cake Pops and 4 sanding sugars from Williams-Sonoma

    Value of giveaway (including shipping to winner): $60.00

    This giveaway is open to only those who reside in the US 


    Bracket Fungi of Berrien County, Michigan: A Preliminary List

    Bracket fungi are a diverse group named more for their similar external morphologies (specifically, bracket- or shelf-like growth habits on dead or living tree trunks, and woody textures) than for their close relationship. The so-called bracket fungi (sometimes referred to as shelf fungi) are typically grouped together in field guides for ease of identification by observers in the field. Additional information about bracket fungi can be found here, and images of some representative species can be viewed here.

    Because the distribution and relative abundance of fungi has been poorly documented in the literature, the following list was derived by scanning six field guides at my disposal (Barron 1999, Bessette and Sundberg 1987, Lincoff 1987, McKnight and McKnight 1987, Miller and Miller 2006, and Smith and Weber 1996) and making educated guesses as to which species were likely to occur in Berrien County based on range and habitat descriptions. The 82 species listed below represent 51 genera, 21 families, 5 orders, and 1 subclass. Given the current state of knowledge of local fungal diversity, I should again emphasize that this is a list of what is possible rather than a list of what has been confirmed in Berrien County and vicinity, and that I have erred on the side of being inclusive rather than exclusive in the case of questionable species.

    Scientific names are those recognized by the Index Fungorum. Higher-order taxonomic categories (i.e., Families, Orders, Subclasses) follow the MushroomExpert; for genera not recognized by the MushroomExpert, taxonomic treatment follows the Index Fungorum.

    There are no officially recognized common names for North American fungi. In many cases, however, North American species of Holarctic distribution have been assigned an "official" English name by the British Mycological Society (see Recommended English Names for Fungi in the UK); these names are capitalized and appear immediately following the scientific name. Where available, other common name(s) shown in curly brackets in lower case are those that appear in one or more of the referenced field guides.

    Authors of field guides treating each species are shown in straight brackets.

    The few species that are Edible or POISONOUS are indicated as such.

    Credit: Dryad's Saddle (Polyporus squamosus), showing typical attachment of bracket fungus to tree trunk. This photo by Walter Baxter is used here courtesy of a Creative Commons licensing agreement.
    Subclass Agaricomycetes
    ORDER AGARICALES

    Family Fistulinaceae:
  • Fistulina hepatica, Beefsteak Fungus {beefsteak fungus, beefsteak, beefsteak polypore} [Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller, Smith] - Edible

    Family Schizophyllaceae:
  • Schizophyllum commune, Split Gill {common split gill} [Lincoff, Miller]

    ORDER HYMENOCHAETALES

    Family Hymenochaetaceae:
  • Coltricia cinnamomea {faiy stook, shiny cinnamon polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Coltricia montagnei {green’s polypore, montagne’s polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Coltricia perennis, Tiger’s Eye [Barron, Miller]
  • Inonotus obliquus {clinker polypore} [Lincoff]
  • Inonotus radiatus, Alder Bracket [Barron]
  • Onnia tomentosa (=Inonotus tomentosus) {woolly velvet polypore [Lincoff]
  • Phelinus chrysoloma {golden spreading polypore} [Lincoff]
  • Phellinus gilvus {mustard yellow polypore} [Lincoff]
  • Phellinus igniarius, Willow Bracket {flecked-flesh polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Phellinus rimosus (=rimosa) {craked-cap polypore} [Lincoff]
  • Porodaedalea (=Phellinus) pini [Miller]

    Family Schizoporaceae:
  • Oxyporus populinus, Poplar Bracket {mossy maple polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Schizopora paradoxa, Split Porecrust {split-pore polypore} [Lincoff]

    ORDER POLYPORALES

    Family Albatrellaceae:
  • Albatrellus caeruleoporus {blue albatrellus, blue-pored polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Albatrellus confluens [Barron, Miller]
  • Albatrellus cristatus {crested polypore} [Lincoff]
  • Albatrellus ovinus {sheep polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller, Smith] - Edible

    Family Altheliaceae:
  • Plicaturopsis crispa {crimped gill} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]

    Family Fomitopsidaceae:
  • Daedalea quercina, Oak Mazegill {oak maze-gill, oak polypore, thick-maze oak polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Fomitopsis cajanderi [Barron]
  • Fomitopsis pinicola {redbelt, red-banded polypore, red-belted polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Piptoporus betulinus, Birch Polypore or Razorstrop Fungus {birch polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Postia (=Tyromyces) caesius, Conifer Blueing Bracket {blue cheese polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Postia fragilis [Barron]

    Family Ganodermataceae:
  • Ganoderma applanatum, Artist’s Bracket {artist’s conk, artist’s fungus} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Ganoderma lucidum, Lacquered Bracket {lancquered polypore, ling chih} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Ganoderma tsugae {hemlock varnish shelf, lacquered polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff]

    Family Gloeophyllaceae:
  • Gloeophyllum sepiarium [yellow-red gill polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]

    Family Hapalopilaceae:
  • Bjerkandera adusta, Smoky Bracket {smoky polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Ceriporia (=Poria) spissa {orange poria} [Lincoff]
  • Hapalopilus nidulans, Cinnamon Bracket {tender nesting polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Ischnoerma resinosum {resinous polypore, late fall polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff]

    Family Meripilaceae:
  • Grifola frondosa, Hen of the Woods {hen of the woods, hen-of-the-woods} [Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller, Smith] - Edible
  • Meripilus giganteus, Giant Polypore {black-staining polypore} [Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller] - Edible

    Family Meruliaceae:
  • Gloeoporus (=Caloporus) dichrous {gelatinous-pored polypore} [Lincoff]
  • Merulius tremellosus (=Phlebia tremellosa), Jelly Rot [Barron, Miller]
  • Phlebia incarnata [Barron, Miller]
  • Phlebia radiata, Wrinkled Crust [Barron]

    Family Phanerochaetacdae:
  • Lopharia cinerascens {bristly parchment} [Lincoff]

    Family Podoscyphaceae:
  • Cotylidia diaphana [Barron]

    Famly Polyporaceae:
  • Cerrena unicolor {mossy maze polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Cryptoporus volvatus {veiled polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Daedaleopsis confragosa, Blushing Bracket {currycomb bracket, thin-maze flat polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Fomes fomentarius, Hoof Fungus or Tinder Bracket {tinder polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Globiformes graveolens {sweet knot} [Lincoff]
  • Hexagonia hirta (=Polyporus hirtus) {bitter iodine polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Laetiporus sulphureus, Chicken of the Woods {chicken of the woods, sulphur shelf} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller, Smith] - Edible
  • Lenzites betulina, Birch Mazegill {birch lenzites, birch maze-gill, gilled bracket, multicolor gill polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight]
  • Phaeolus schweinitzii, Dyer’s Mazegill {die maker’s polypore, dye polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Polyporus alveolaris (=mori) [Barron, Miller] - Edible (when young)
  • Polyporus arcularius (=Favolus alveolaris) {spring polypore, hexagonal-pored polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Polyporus badius {bay-brown polypore, black-footed polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Polyporus brumalis, Winter Polypore {winter polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Polyporus radicatus {rooting polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Polyporus squamosus, Dryad’s Saddle {dryad’s saddle, dryad saddle, scaly polyporus} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Smith]
  • Polyporus umbellatus, Umbrella Polypore {umbrella polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight]
  • Polyporus varius {blackfoot polypore, elegant polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Poronidulus (=Trametes) conchifer {little nest polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Pycnoporus cinnabarinus {cinnabar polypore, cinnabar red polypore, cinnabar-red polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Trametes hirsuta, Hairy Bracket [Barron]
  • Trametes pubescens [Barron]
  • Trametes (=Coriolus) versicolor, Turkeytail {turkey tail, turkey-tail} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Trichaptum abietinum (=abietinus), Purplepore Bracket [Barron, Bessette]
  • Trichaptum biforme (=biformis {violet toothed polypore, purple-toothed polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Tyromyces chioneus {white cheese polypore} [Barron, Lincoff]

    Family Steccherinaceae:
  • Irpex lacteus {milk-white toothed polypore} [Lincoff]

    ORDER RUSSULALES

    Family Bondarzewiaceae:
  • Bondarzewia berkeleyi {berkeley’s polypore} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Heterobasidion annosum, Root Rot [conifer-base polypore} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, Miller]

    Family Peniophoraceae:
  • Peniophora rufa [Barron]

    Family Stereaceae:
  • Stereum complicatum {crowded parchment} [Lincoff, Miller]
  • Stereum hirsutum, Hairy Curtain Crust {hairy parchment} [Barron, Lincoff]
  • Stereum ostrea {false turkey tail, false turkey-tail, false turkeytail} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Stereum (=Haematostereum) sanguinolentum, Bleeding Conifer {bleeding conifer parchment} [Lincoff]
  • Stereum striatum {silky parchment} [Lincoff]
  • Xylobolus frustulatus {ceramic fungus, ceramic parchment} [Barron, Lincoff]

    ORDER THELEPHORALES

    Family Bankeraceae:
  • Boletopsis subsquamosa {kurotake} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller] - Edible

    Family Thelephoraceae:
  • Thelephora caryophyllea {carnation fungus, carnation groundwart} [Barron]
  • Thelephora palmata, Stinking Earthfan [Barron, Miller]
  • Thelephora terrestris, Earthfan {common fiber vase, earth fan, groundwart} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Sources:

    Barron, George. 1999. Mushrooms of northeast North America: Midwest to New England. Lone Pine Publishing, Auburn, Washington. 336 pp.

    Bessette, Alan, and Walter J. Sunderg. 1987. Mushrooms: a quick reference guide to mushrooms of North America. McMillan Publishing Company, New York, New York. 173 pp.

    Lincoff, Gary H. 1987. The Audubon Society field guide to North American mushrooms. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York. 926 pp.

    McKnight, Kent H., and Vera B. McKnight. 1987. A field guide to mushrooms of North America. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 429 pp.

    Miller, Orson K., and Hope H. Miller. 2006. North American mushrooms: a field guide to edible and inedible fungi. Falcon Guides, Guilford, Connecticut. 583 pp.

    Smith, Alexander H., and Nancy Smith Weber. 1996. The mushroom hunter’s guide. University of Michigan Press and Thunder Bay Press. 316 pp.

    Monday, October 11, 2010

    Meeting the Cake Pop Pioneer

    Today, was an interesting day! I made it down to South Coast Plaza to Williams-Sonoma because Bakerella was doing a book signing and demonstration (at least that was what the email said). I walk into the store, which already has 80 people standing around waiting for the Cake Pop lady herself...only to be told there isn't a demo (bummer! I thought we would get to sample cake pops!) but instead a 15 minute Q & A session. Ok, well I can stand in the crowd to get a glimpse of baking royalty! 


    There she is! Beautiful, fun and oh so...sweet! Her name is Angie Dudley and she is the pioneer of the cake pop...those wildly popular 2-bite cake balls on a stick! She doesn't sell them direct, but she does show you and tell you how to make them - on her blog and in her new book.


    She gave some helpful hints on things to use like:


    Gourmet Writer 

    Food Decorator Pens


    Gourmet Writer Food Decorator Pens, Assorted Colors, Set of 10

    You will also need some sucker sticks. These are fairly inexpensive:
    6 X 5/32" SUCKERSTICK Paper Sucker Lolly Lollipop Sticks 50 Count


    It was great to hear her talk about them - and see how excited everyone was to make them (myself included!). I bought all the little goodies I could find at Williams-Sonoma and this will be my project for Halloween! Here's a pic of Angie signing my books!



    Sunday, October 10, 2010

    Vintage Wedding

    The vintage theme is still hot for modern weddings! I like the look and feel of the vintage touches added to weddings - the palettes are usually very soft and feminine. For example, this wedding gown has a gorgeous back with cascading ruffled lace:

    The gown looks gorgeous with the multiple strands of ivory pearls, but the back has a rhinestone clasp so either jewels would pair up with this gown. Some other favorite finds in this color scheme:



    Also found this little cute FREE Vintage Save the Date card on WeddingChicks.com:
    freesavethedatecard


    Saturday, October 9, 2010

    No matter how you look at it....if you are planning a wedding HE will be the MR and SHE will be the MRS! I have found a few items to show off those new titles you will forever be known as...

    MR and MRS Gift Set .. silver cuff links and crystal dangle earrings

    Mr. and Mrs. Sweetheart table letters for a wedding- Custom colors

    MR / MRS 9 x 5 Chair Signs VISIT MY STORE FOR OVER 80 DIFFERENT WEDDING SIGNS

    Club and Coral Fungi of Berrien County, Michigan: A Preliminary List

    Club and coral fungi are a diverse group named more for their similar external morphologies (specifically, a coral- or club-like shape) than for their close relationship. The so-called coral and club fungi are typically grouped together in field guides for ease of identification by observers in the field. Additional information about coral and club fungi can be found here, and images of some representative species can be viewed here.

    Because the distribution and relative abundance of fungi has been poorly documented in the literature, the following list was derived by scanning six field guides at my disposal (Barron 1999, Bessette and Sundberg 1987, Lincoff 1987, McKnight and McKnight 1987, Miller and Miller 2006, and Smith and Weber 1996) and making educated guesses as to which species were likely to occur in Berrien County based on range and habitat descriptions. The 43 species listed below represent 16 genera, 10 families, 8 orders, and 2 subclasses. Given the current state of knowledge of local fungal diversity, I should again emphasize that this is a list of what is possible rather than a list of what has been confirmed in Berrien County and vicinity, and that I have erred on the side of being inclusive rather than exclusive in the case of questionable species.

    Scientific names are those recognized by the Index Fungorum. Higher-order taxonomic categories (i.e., Families, Orders, Subclasses) follow the MushroomExpert; for genera not recognized by the MushroomExpert, taxonomic treatment follows the Index Fungorum.

    There are no officially recognized common names for North American fungi. In many cases, however, North American species of Holarctic distribution have been assigned an "official" English name by the British Mycological Society (see Recommended English Names for Fungi in the UK); these names are capitalized and appear immediately following the scientific name. Where available, other common name(s) shown in curly brackets in lower case are those that appear in one or more of the referenced field guides.

    Authors of field guides treating each species are shown in straight brackets.

    The few species that are Edible or POISONOUS are indicated as such.

    Credit: Golden Coral (Ramaria aurea) is one of the edible coral fungi. This photo by Manfred Bromba is used here courtesy of permission granted by Wikipedia Commons.
    Subclass AGARICOMYCETIDAE
    ORDER AGARICALES

    Family Clavariaceae:
  • Alloclavaria (=Clavaria) purpurea, Purple Spindles {purple club coral, purple coral} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller] - Edible
  • Clavaria fragilis (=vermicularis), White Spindles {white worm coral, worm-like coral} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller] - Edible
  • Clavaria fumosa, Smokey Spindles [Barron]
  • Clavaria rosea, Rose Spindles {rosy club coral} [Barron]
  • Clavaria zollingeri, Violet Coral {magenta coral} [McKnight, Miller]
  • Clavulinopsis corniculata, Meadow Coral [Barron]
  • Clavulinopsis fusiformis, Golden Spindles {spindle-shaped coral, spindle-shaped yellow coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Macrotyphula juncea, Slender Club {fairy thread} [Barron]
  • Multiclavula mucida {white green-algae coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]

    Family Marasmiaceae:
  • Physalacria inflata {bladder stalks} [Lincoff]

    ORDER CANTHARELLALES

    Family Clavulinaceae:
  • Clavulina amethystina {violet-branched coral} [Lincoff]
  • Clavulina cinerea, Grey Coral {gray coral} [Barron, Miller, Smith] - Edible
  • Clavulina coralloides (=cristata), Crested Coral {cockscomb coral, crested coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller] - Edible
  • Clavulina (=Clavaria) ornatipes [Barron]
  • Clavulina rugosa [Barron] - Edible

    ORDER PHALLALES

    Family Gomphaceae:
  • Clavariadelphus ligula {strap-shaped coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller, Smith]
  • Clavariadelphus pistillaris, Giant Club {pestle-shaped coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller, Smith] - Edible
  • Clavariadelphus truncatus {flat-topped coral} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller, Smith] - Edible
  • Lentaria byssiseda {cotton-based coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller]
  • Ramariopsis crocea {orange-yellow ramariopsis} [Barron]
  • Ramariopsis kunzei, Ivory Coral {white coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller] - Edible
  • Ramariopsis laeticolor [Barron]

    Family Ramariaceae:
  • Ramaria abietina [Barron, Miller]
  • Ramaria apiculata {green-tipped coral} [McKnight]
  • Ramaria aurea {golden coral} [Barron, Miller, Smith] - Edible
  • Ramaria bataillei [Miller] - POISONOUS
  • Ramaria botrytis, Rosso Coral {clustered coral} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller, Smith] - Edible
  • Ramaria formosa, {pink-tipped coral, yellow-tipped coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Smith] - POISONOUS
  • Ramaria gelatinosa [Miller, Smith]
  • Ramaria stricta, Upright Coral {straight-branched coral} [Barron, Lincoff, Miller, Smith]
  • Ramaria subbotrytis [Miller, Smith] - Edible

    ORDER POLYPORALES

    Family Sparassidaceae:
  • Sparassis crispa, Wood Cauliflower {eastern cauliflower mushroom} [Lincoff, Smith] - Edible
  • Sparassis laminosa (=herbstii) {eastern cauliflower} [Barron] - Edible
  • Sparassis spathulata {eastern cauliflower mushroom} [Bessette] - Edible

    ORDER RUSSULALES

    Family Auriscalpiaceae:
  • Artomyces pyxidatus (=Clavicorona pyxidata), Candelabra Coral {crown coral, crown-tipped coral) [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller, Smith] - Edible

    ORDER THELEPHORALES

    Family Thelephoraceae:
  • Thelephora terrestris, Earthfan {common fiber vase} [Lincoff]
  • Thelephora vialis {vase thelephore} [Lincoff]

    Subclass SORDARIOMYCETIDAE

    ORDER HYPOCREALES

    Family Clavicipitaceae:
  • Cordyceps melolonthae {beetle cordyceps, rhinoceros beetle cordyceps} [Bessette, Lincoff]
  • Cordyceps militaris, Scarlet Caterpillarclub {orange-colored cordyceps, soldier grainy club, trooping cordyceps} [Barron, Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Cordyceps ophioglossoides, Snaketongue Truffleclub {adder’s tongue, goldenthread cordyceps} [Barron, Lincoff]

    ORDER XYLARIALES

    Family Xylariaceae:
  • Xylaria hypoxylon, Candlesnuff Fungus {carbon antlers} [Bessette, Lincoff, McKnight]
  • Xylaria longipes, Dead Moll's Fingers {stalked xylaria} [Barron]
  • Xylaria polymorpha, Dead Man's Fingers {dead man’s fingers, dead-man’s fingers} [Barron, Lincoff, McKnight, Miller]
  • Sources:

    Barron, George. 1999. Mushrooms of northeast North America: Midwest to New England. Lone Pine Publishing, Auburn, Washington. 336 pp.

    Bessette, Alan, and Walter J. Sunderg. 1987. Mushrooms: a quick reference guide to mushrooms of North America. McMillan Publishing Company, New York, New York. 173 pp.

    Lincoff, Gary H. 1987. The Audubon Society field guide to North American mushrooms. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York. 926 pp.

    McKnight, Kent H., and Vera B. McKnight. 1987. A field guide to mushrooms of North America. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 429 pp.

    Miller, Orson K., and Hope H. Miller. 2006. North American mushrooms: a field guide to edible and inedible fungi. Falcon Guides, Guilford, Connecticut. 583 pp.

    Smith, Alexander H., and Nancy Smith Weber. 1996. The mushroom hunter’s guide. University of Michigan Press and Thunder Bay Press. 316 pp.

    Thursday, October 7, 2010

    Michigan Bayous

    Not until a recent visit to the vicinity of Grand Haven did I realize that Michigan has bayous, or at least has water features in which the term “bayou” has been incorporated into the name. Having always associated a bayou with the coastal streams and marshes of the Gulf Coast, especially Louisiana, I was surprised to find this to be true.

    According to Wikipedia, a bayou "is a body of water typically found in flat, low-lying areas, and can refer either to an extremely slow-moving stream or river (often with a poorly defined shoreline), or to a marshy lake or wetland."

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) lists at least 50 distinct water features in Michigan that have been denoted as bayous. These 50 features are distributed among 9 different counties, being most numerous in Ottawa (14) and Manistee (11), where they are probably associated with the lower reaches of the Grand and Manistee rivers, respectively. The GNIS classifies these features variously as guts (16), bays (14), swamps (8), lakes (7), and streams (5).

    Wednesday, October 6, 2010

    Cake Pops

    I am totally in love with cake pops! I actually ordered some from My3lilcupcakes to give out as "Thank You" favors at my daughters 4th birthday party! It seems like they are gaining in popularity too! When I first heard about Cake Pops it was while reading a blog that mentioned Bakerella. I fell in love with these little guys from there. Bakerella focuses on fun and easy baking. You will find recipes, desserts, decorating and lot's of directions on how to do it yourself....like these:


    Wedding Cake Pops

    Which you can turn into this....
    Will
    Will You
    Will  You Marry
    Will You Marry Me

    Pretty cute huh? Do you want to attempt these? The recipe and directions can be found here! So, I bet you can imagine how excited I was to get an email from Williams-Sonoma telling me that Bakerella was doing a book signing and demonstration at their South Coast Plaza (Orange County, Calif) store on October 11th! If you want to see if Bakerella will be in your area - check the schedule here!


    And the winner is.....

    Thank you all for entering our giveaway! We are very happy to announce that random.org picked the winner....I know, I know....it's an easy way to get a winner - they do all the work! ;) So, while I know you are just checking to see if YOU won....well, you did if you made THIS comment:

    TheCuttingEtch said...
    Tweet http://twitter.com/TheCuttingEtch/status/25408186601
    TheCuttingEtch1 (at) yahoo (dot) com

    Congrats to you! Now, just send me a little email with all your info and I will get the little hankie mailed right out. You hanger will take a little bit of time to be made by LilaFrances - so also let me know what you want from her shop so I can get it ordered right away! ~~~~~Congrats Again!~~~~~